China’s Belt and Road Initiative to boost civil aviation in Africa

DUBAI – China’s Belt and Road Initiative will bring more Chinese investment and Asian passengers to Africa, African civil aviation officials said on Sunday. 

Speaking to Xinhua on the sidelines of the Aviation Africa 2015 summit, Ms Dzifa Aku Attivor, Ghana’s transport minister, said her country welcome additional Chinese engagement in Africa’s underdeveloped civil aviation market. 

She said Africa stands for 12 percent of the world’s total population but only one percent of the global aviation market. 

Ghana is open for business, and welcomes any initiative that can connect Asia with the rest of the world, including the Belt and Road Initiative, which was put forward by Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2013, she said.

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/business/2015-05/11/content_20679300.htm

EAR99 and 5D992 Software Exceptions with Respect to the Crimea Region of Ukraine

OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL Executive Order 13685 of December 19, 2014 Blocking Property of Certain Persons and Prohibiting Certain Transactions With Respect to the Crimea Region of Ukraine GENERAL LICENSE NO. 9 Exportation of Certain Services and Software Incident to Internet-Based Communications Authorized (a) Except as provided m paragraph (d) of this general license, the exportation or reexportation, directly or indirectly, from the United States or by U.S. persons, wherever located, to persons in the Crimea region of Ukraine of services incident to the exchange of personal communications over the Internet, such as instant messaging, chat and email, social networking, sharing of photos and movies, web browsing, and blogging, is authorized, provided that such services are widely available to the public at no cost to the user. (b) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this general license, the exportation or reexportation, directly or indirectly, from the United States or by U.S. persons, wherever located, to persons in the Crimea region of Ukfaine of software necessary to enable the services described in paragraph (a) of this general license is authorized, provided that such software is designated EAR99 under the Export Administration Regulations, 15 CFR parts 730 through 774 (the “EAR”), or is classified by the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) as mass market software under export control classification number (ECCN) 5D992 of the EAR, and provided further that such software is widely available to the public at no cost to the user. (c) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this general license, the exportation or reexportation, directly or indirectly, from the United States or by U.S. persons, wherever located, to persons in the Crimea region of Ukraine of software that is not subject to the EAR because it is of foreign origin and is located outside the United States that is necessary to enable the services described in paragraph (a) of this general license is authorized, provided that such software would be designated EAR99 if it were located in the United States or would meet the criteria for classification under ECCN 5D992 of the EAR if it were subject to the EAR, and provided further that such software is widely available to the public at no cost to the user. (d) This general license does not authorize: (1) The exportation or reexportation, directly or indirectly, of services or software with knowledge or reason to know that such services or software are intended for any person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to Executive Order 13660 of March 6, 2014, Executive Order 13661 of March 17, 2014, Executive Order 13662 of March 20, 2014, or Executive Order 13685 of December 19, 2014; (2) The exportation or reexportation, directly or indirectly, of any goods or technology listed on the Commerce Control List in the EAR, 15 CFR part 774, supplement No. 1 (CCL), except for software necessary to enable the services described in paragraph (a) of this general license that is classified by Commerce as mass market software under ECCN 5D992 of the EAR; (3) The exportation or reexportation, directly or indirectly, of commercial-grade Internet comiectivity services or telecommunications transmission facilities (such as dedicated satellite links or dedicated lines that include quality of service guarantees); or (4) The exportation or reexportation, directly or indirectly, of web-hosting services that are for commercial endeavors or of domain name registration services. (e) Specific licenses may be issued on a case-by-case basis for the exportation or reexportation of services or software incident to the exchange of personal communications over the Internet not specified in paragraphs (a), (b), or (c) of this general license, and for the exportation or reexportation of hardware incident to the exchange of personal communications over the Internet. Note to General License 9: Nothing in this general license or in any license issued pursuant to paragraph (e) of this general license relieves the exporter from compliance with the export license application requirements of another Federal agency. John E. Smith Acting Director Office of Foreign Assets Control Dated: May 22, 2015

http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sanctions/Programs/Documents/ukraine_gl_9.pdf

BIS ADDS AL NASER AIRLINES TO MAHAN AIR TEMPORARY DENIAL ORDER

Thursday, May 21, 2015

BIS ADDS AL NASER AIRLINES TO MAHAN AIR TEMPORARY DENIAL ORDER

WASHINGTON– The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) today issued an order denying the export privileges of Al Naser Airlines, Bahar Safwa General Trading, and Ali Abdullah Alhay for ongoing efforts to illegally export civilian aircraft to Iran in violation of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR).

Also today, the U.S. Department of the Treasury designated Iraq-based Al-Naser Airlines, Syrian businessman Issam Shammout, and his UAE-based Sky Blue Bird Aviation pursuant to Executive Order 13224, a counter-terrorism authority. These entities and this individual were sanctioned for providing support to Iran’s Mahan Air, which was designated in October 2011 pursuant to E.O. 13224 for providing financial, material and technological support to Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force (IRGC-QF).

The BIS order adds the parties to an existing Temporary Denial Order (TDO) against Mahan Air of Iran. TDOs are issued by the Assistant Secretary for Export Enforcement denying the export privileges of a company or individual to prevent an imminent or on-going export control violation. These orders are issued for a renewable 180-day period and cut off not only the right to export from the United States, but also the right to receive or participate in exports and reexports from the United States or in other transactions that are subject to the EAR..

According to the TDO, Al Naser Airlines, based in Iraq, sought to acquire, for Mahan Air, at least two Airbus aircraft that were located in the United States. Ali Abdullah Alhay, a twenty-five percent owner of Al Naser Airlines who was acting on its behalf, signed a Letter of Intent for the aircraft as well as subsequent Sales Agreements. Payments were wired from the account of Bahar Safwa General Trading of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, an entity suspected of acting as a front company for Mahan.

Agents from the BIS Office of Export Enforcement detained the two aircraft prior to their export from the United States. Recent press reports indicate that Al Naser Airlines continues its efforts to procure commercial aircraft for Mahan Air.

Mahan Air has been subject to a Temporary Denial Order since 2008 that has been successively renewed, most recently in January 2015 for its on-going procurement efforts and attempts to evade U.S. export law. Additionally, in October 2011, the U.S. Department of the Treasury named Mahan Air as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist for providing financial, material and technological support to Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force.

BIS controls exports and re-exports of commodities, technology, and software to support national security and foreign policy, including nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, and missile non-proliferation, human rights, regional stability, and curbing terrorism. Criminal penalties and administrative sanctions can be imposed for violations of the Export Administration Regulations. For more information, please visit www.bis.doc.gov.

http://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/about-bis/newsroom/press-releases/172-about-bis/newsroom/press-releases/press-releases-2015/868-bis-adds-al-naser-airlines-to-mahan-air-temporary-denial-order

 

All Service Ports within CBP can now process entries via ACE Cargo Release

SERVICE PORT OF MILWAUKEE BULLETIN NOTICE:

 

To: Customhouse Brokers, Importers, and Others Concerned

The purpose of this Bulletin Notice is to let the trade know that all Service Ports within CBP can now process entries via ACE Cargo Release. Attached to this Notice is the newly published ACE Cargo Release Business Transition Process-Draft. Copied from this draft is the purpose of the publication immediately below:

“The purpose of this document is to outline Cargo Release processing in the Automated Commercial
Environment (ACE) and provide a comparison to the processing CBP has performed for many years. This is not a technical document designed to allow for software development. That can be found in the ACE CATAIR found online at http://www.cbp.gov/document/guidance/cargo-release-ace-catair-chapter. Where appropriate, changes from current processes and policy are highlighted in this document. To allow for the November 1, 2015 deadline for transition to the ACE Cargo Release system, each chapter of this document is divided into three sections:
• Current process – this section identifies existing processes utilizing ACS and/or paper forms. In cases of entry summary processing, it also defines current ACE Entry Summary processes.
• Transition process – This describes the steps needed to transition to a fully automated environment from a paper dependent one and includes some interim processes for continuation of submission of paper form and legacy processes for both CBP and Partner Government Agencies (PGA).
• To-Be process – this describes the end state processing in a fully automated environment.
Additionally, this document is divided into CBP processes only and PGA processes. The PGA processes
are divided into chapters with general system processing information for PGAs followed by specific
chapters for each PGA with information on their participation and expectations form by form (or process).”

The Service Port of Milwaukee has three ACE Ambassadors to assist you in this transition. They are as follows:

CBPO Toni Mussa for questions relating to Entry/Cargo Release 414-486-7790 ext. 134
Entry Specialist Sarah Falvey for question relating to Entry Summary 414-486-7790 ext. 139
Supervisory Entry Officer Gerard Lefever 414-486-7790 ext. 129.
/Signed/
Gerard Lefever
for William E. Braun
Service Port Director
Port of Milwaukee

China says U.S. welcome to use civilian facilities in South China Sea

The United States and other countries will be welcome to use civilian facilities China is building in the South China Sea for search and rescue and weather forecasting “when conditions are right”, China’s navy chief has told a senior U.S. officer.

China claims 90 percent of the South China Sea, which is believed to be rich in oil and gas, with overlapping claims from Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Taiwan.

Recent satellite images show China has made rapid progress in building an airstrip suitable for military use in the disputed Spratly Islands and may be planning another.

Those moves, along with other reclamations, have caused alarm around the region and in Washington too, with the issue dominating a summit of Southeast Asian leaders this week, to China’s displeasure.

In a teleconference with the U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Jonathan Greenert, China’s navy chief Wu Shengli said China’s building work in the South China Sea would not affect freedom of navigation or overflight.

“Instead, it will improve the ability in these seas of public services like weather forecasting and maritime search and rescue, fulfilling international obligations to maintain the security of international seas,” Wu said, according to a Chinese Defence Ministry statement released late on Thursday.

“(We) welcome international organizations, the United States and relevant countries to use these facilities in the future when conditions are right, to have cooperation on humanitarian search and rescue and disaster relief,” Wu added.

The statement cited Greenert as saying he hoped China could explain to countries in the region in a timely manner the aim of the building work. It would also be good for maintaining stability and freedom of navigation if other countries could use such facilities for joint humanitarian operations, he said.

Disputes over how to tackle an increasingly assertive stance by China – an ally of several Southeast Asian states – in the strategic South China Sea make the issue the region’s biggest potential military flashpoint.

China this week accused Vietnam, the Philippines and others of carrying out their own illegal building work.

While the militaries of China and the United States have worked hard to improve communication and cooperation, there is still deep mistrust. In 2013, a U.S. guided missile cruiser narrowly avoided a collision with a Chinese warship in the South China Sea.

Wu said U.S. surveillance operations were “totally out of step” with efforts to improve their military relations.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Paul Tait)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/05/01/us-china-usa-southchinasea-idUSKBN0NM31620150501